Lupe Valdez’s Performance Against Greg Abbott May Test the Strength of the ‘Beto Effect’

Even an extraordinary Democratic candidate running a flawless campaign would face difficult odds against Abbott.

Lupe Valdez
Lupe Valdez Michael Barajas

Barring divine intervention, Greg Abbott will handily beat Lupe Valdez — the only real question is by how much. The floor, if there is one, is Wendy Davis’ crushing loss to Greg Abbott by 20 percentage points in 2014. Abbott has the money, the power of incumbency, the “R” behind his name and more cash than an offshore account in the Cayman Islands. At the one and only gubernatorial debate, Abbott barely even acknowledged Valdez’s presence onstage, instead reciting anodyne talking points while making minor news about an extremely modest marijuana measure.

To her credit, Valdez has done more than a lot of bigger-name Democrats who have been “up and coming” for so long they’ve worn out the phrase: She is running. But even an extraordinary Democratic candidate running a flawless campaign would face difficult odds against Abbott, whose lackluster governing style doesn’t seem to bother the Republican electorate. That, I think it’s fair to say, does not describe Valdez or her campaign.

Interestingly, there is an unusually energetic Democratic candidate running a well-above-average statewide campaign this cycle — Beto O’Rourke affords us a rare opportunity to see just how much of a difference all that makes. Polls consistently show Abbott leading Valdez by 10 to 20 percentage points, while Ted Cruz appears to have a much narrower single digit lead over O’Rourke. That’s a remarkably steep drop-off. Are there really that many voters who will vote for Beto O’Rourke and Greg Abbott? I want to meet these strange folks! In any case, the Abbott/Valdez and Cruz/O’Rourke results will be meaningful, but imperfect, data points to gauge the “Beto effect.”

One other thing: If Valdez loses, and loses badly, perhaps it will finally put to rest the persistent notion that a Hispanic surname near the top of the ballot magically brings Latinos to the polls, even when said surname has little money or organizational oomph behind it. In truth, this has already been proved — anyone remember Linda Chavez-Thompson or Rick Noriega? — but some lessons are only learned in their repetition.

Forrest Wilder, a native of Wimberley, Texas, is the editor of the Observer.

Get the latest Texas Observer news, analysis and investigations via FacebookTwitter and our weekly newsletter.

Enter your email


 

You May Also Like:

Published at 11:00 am CST
Top