Sasha von Oldershausen

Sasha von Oldershausen is an Iranian-American reporter who lives in Far West Texas and has written for New York Magazine, VICE News and Mic, among others. A New Yorker by birth, she moved to Texas a little over a year ago and has never regretted the decision.

By Sasha von Oldershausen:

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Border

Somewhere It Hides a Well

Learning to look past borderland tropes in Presidio.

The photograph, taken in 1975, shows a long dirt road receding into blue mountains. A chain-link fence runs along the left side of the road, and on the right, a series of one-story adobe façades, pink like the dirt. Beside … Read More

Pronghorn release in West Texas
Culture

For Texas Pronghorn, an Unusual 500-Mile Journey

Wildlife experts are airlifting and trucking pronghorn into West Texas in hopes of replenishing a shrinking population.

Wildlife experts are airlifting and trucking pronghorn into West Texas in hopes of replenishing a shrinking population. Read More

Crop for hero spot
Border

Crossing Over

For families living on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border, breaching the divide is a way of life.

For families living on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border, breaching the divide is a way of life. Read More

Businesses like Presidio's J&R Stockyards, where horses are inspected before being transported to Mexico for slaughter, have cropped up along the border.
Border

The Business of Burying Horses

The border town of Presidio loses money every time it buries a dead horse — and nowadays there are hundreds of them.

Presidio is the last stop for horses on their way to slaughter in Mexico, but many don't make it that far, causing headache, and heartache, for many. Read More

A "Welcome to Presidio" sign at the Texas-Mexico border.
Border

Western Block: One Woman’s Quest for Citizenship

Refujia Roman-Chavez could be a U.S. citizen, but she can't prove it without the cooperation of the West Texas border agents who’ve repeatedly told her to return to Mexico.

Much as undocumented parents have struggled with a sometimes hostile Texas bureaucracy that hinders easy access to their American-born kids’ birth certificates, people like Roman-Chavez, who may have strong claims to citizenship, grapple with the process to verify their claims. Read More

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