Robyn Ross

Contributing writer Robyn Ross lives in Austin.
 

The New Ensemble

by | Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 8:00 am CST
Shahram Ebadfardzadeh, left, and Hormoz Ebadeh Ahvazi prepare a fire during a day of remembrance at the Guadalupe River near San Antonio. They'll eat while praying for the souls of people who have died.
Culture

San Antonio Embraces Mandaean Refugees

If the Mandaean religion survives, it will be partly because of the refuge it found in Central Texas.

Against the Current If the Mandaean religion survives, it will be partly because of the refuge it found in Central Texas. Text by Robyn Ross Photos by Matthew Busch February 17, 2020 Dressed in white, six Mandaean men stand by … Read More

Cameron Dezen Hammon
Books

A Bold New Memoir Struggles to Reconcile Faith and Feminism

Cameron Dezen Hammon’s memoir asks how many ways there are to be a Christian woman—and explores the sexism deeply embedded in evangelical churches.

When Cameron Dezen Hammon first becomes a Christian at age 26, she tries to make sense of historical conflicts like the Crusades. How can God be good when his human representatives are so terrible? “God is not the church,” her … Read More

Sergio Mata (Installation View) 21 Art Saints, Selena Hexaptych, Sergio Mata Hexaptych, and Princess Diana Hexaptych, 2019, Digital photographs on paper, Dimensions variable
Art

Immigrants Put Down Roots in a San Antonio Art Exhibit

Admitted: USA paired immigrant artists with mentors who helped them write an artist statement and grant proposals, apply for public art commissions, and market themselves on social media.

A solitary orange chair in the middle of a courtyard. Doors set into colorful walls, dappled with sunlight and shadow. A mural of a fortune-teller, marred by a crack. More than 100 five-by-seven-inch photographs stretch in rows across a white … Read More

Art

‘Man on Fire’ Searches in Vain for the Truth About Racism in East Texas

The new documentary asks why a minister self-immolated in the town of Grand Saline, but doesn’t uncover any new answers.

On June 23, 2014, 79-year-old retired Methodist minister Charles Moore drove to the parking lot of a Dollar General store in his hometown of Grand Saline, east of Dallas. He paced back and forth, then knelt on a cushion, poured … Read More

Books

‘When I Spoke in Tongues’ Chronicles a Long Walk Away from the Church

For readers who’ve wrestled with their religious upbringing, Jessica Wilbanks evokes a powerful sense of loss: the loss of the person she used to be, and of the person she might have become, had she stayed inside the fold.

On a research trip to Nigeria, Houston writer Jessica Wilbanks fills out a questionnaire after attending a Pentecostal church service. The form asks a series of intensely personal questions that transport her back to her rural Maryland childhood in the … Read More

Books

The King of Pulp

In Cross Plains, a literary festival honors the most influential Texas writer you've never heard of.

In Cross Plains, a literary festival honors Robert E. Howard, the most influential Texas writer you've never heard of. Read More

Environment

A Fork in the Road

Can the local food movement help Elgin reclaim its farming roots?

Can the local food movement help Elgin reclaim its farming roots? Read More

July 2016 issue culture
Art

Isn’t It Iconic?

The price tag on a new public sculpture in San Antonio renews a 20-year debate over whether a city program creates art — or just controversy.

The price tag on a new public sculpture in San Antonio renews a 20-year debate over whether a city program creates art — or just controversy. Read More

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