Robyn Ross

Contributing writer Robyn Ross lives in Austin.

By Robyn Ross:

Art

‘Man on Fire’ Searches in Vain for the Truth About Racism in East Texas

The new documentary asks why a minister self-immolated in the town of Grand Saline, but doesn’t uncover any new answers.

On June 23, 2014, 79-year-old retired Methodist minister Charles Moore drove to the parking lot of a Dollar General store in his hometown of Grand Saline, east of Dallas. He paced back and forth, then knelt on a cushion, poured … Read More

Books

‘When I Spoke in Tongues’ Chronicles a Long Walk Away from the Church

For readers who’ve wrestled with their religious upbringing, Jessica Wilbanks evokes a powerful sense of loss: the loss of the person she used to be, and of the person she might have become, had she stayed inside the fold.

On a research trip to Nigeria, Houston writer Jessica Wilbanks fills out a questionnaire after attending a Pentecostal church service. The form asks a series of intensely personal questions that transport her back to her rural Maryland childhood in the … Read More

Books

The King of Pulp

In Cross Plains, a literary festival honors the most influential Texas writer you've never heard of.

In Cross Plains, a literary festival honors Robert E. Howard, the most influential Texas writer you've never heard of. Read More

Environment

A Fork in the Road

Can the local food movement help Elgin reclaim its farming roots?

Can the local food movement help Elgin reclaim its farming roots? Read More

July 2016 issue culture
Art

Isn’t It Iconic?

The price tag on a new public sculpture in San Antonio renews a 20-year debate over whether a city program creates art — or just controversy.

The price tag on a new public sculpture in San Antonio renews a 20-year debate over whether a city program creates art — or just controversy. Read More

Criminal Justice

The Draw of Death Row

With “dark tourism” on the rise, Huntsville’s prison museum is thriving.

The gift shop offers shirts honoring the electric chair: "Home of Old Sparky," and the museum's visitors get a 'selectively edited' history of corrections. Read More

Art

Reinventing Texas

History takes the stage in Palo Duro Canyon

Produced annually by the Texas Panhandle Heritage Foundation, "Texas" is the best-attended outdoor history drama in the nation. Though it debuted 50 years ago, its depiction of life in the Texas Panhandle represents a romanticized version of our history that, in some ways, hasn't changed. Read More

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