After a Year of Racial Reckoning, Black Lawmakers Believe They Can Finally Eliminate Confederate Heroes Day in Texas

On Tuesday, some Texans will take a paid day off for a state holiday honoring Robert E. Lee, Jefferson Davis and other leaders of the Confederate army.

A 1903 Confederate monument stands at the south entrance to the Texas Capitol grounds.
A 1903 Confederate monument stands at the south entrance to the Texas Capitol grounds. Miguel Gutierrez Jr./The Texas Tribune

On Tuesday, some Texans will take a paid day off for a state holiday honoring Robert E. Lee, Jefferson Davis and other leaders of the Confederate army.

A 1903 Confederate monument stands at the south entrance to the Texas Capitol grounds.
A 1903 Confederate monument stands at the south entrance to the Texas Capitol grounds. Miguel Gutierrez Jr./The Texas Tribune

This story was originally published by the Texas Tribune. The Texas Tribune is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans—and engages with them—about public policy, politics, government and statewide issue.

The day after Martin Luther King Jr. Day, a federal holiday honoring a leader of the American civil rights movement, some Texas employees will also take a paid day off this Tuesday for Confederate Heroes Day — a state holiday falling on Robert E. Lee’s birthday, intended to celebrate him, Jefferson Davis and other Confederate soldiers.

For years, a handful of Texas lawmakers have tried in vain to pass legislation that would remove or replace the holiday celebrating leaders of the Confederate army.

But they say this year feels different.

Demonstrators across the nation spent months over the summer protesting police brutality and racial injustice, leading many states to initiate mass removals of Confederate memorials.

“The killing of George Floyd, a Texan, and the killing of Atatiana Jefferson, another Texan, at the hands of law enforcement, certainly do underscore the importance of removing a day of remembrance that brings to the mind slavery and oppression,” said state Rep. Nicole Collier, D-Fort Worth, chairperson of the Legislative Black Caucus.

Texas isn’t alone in its recognition of the controversial holiday. Eight other states have similar Confederate memorial days throughout the year: Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Louisiana, Tennessee and Virginia. Mississippi and Alabama also have a joint Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert E. Lee Day.

The birthdays of Lee and Davis used to be separate Texas holidays, but lawmakers consolidated them in 1973 to create Confederate Heroes Day.

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