Culture

 

Burn It All Down

by | Mon, Sep 24, 2018 at 6:47 CST
Ben Fountain’s new book of essays chronicles the ascent of Trumpism with a keen eye for the past, present and future.
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A Vampire Book That Does Not Suck

Written in the style of an oral history, Raymond A. Villareal’s novel quaffs greedily from the arteries of its literary antecedents.

In the border town of Nogales, Arizona, the body of a 28-year-old woman with unusual bruising has gone missing. The coroner’s office staff thinks it might be ...Read More

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‘Driven’ is an Edgy Memoir of Cars, Crises and Coming of Age

Melissa Stephenson’s new book exploits the bread and butter of memoir — parsing childhood experiences and complicated family dynamics — but also explores more experimental terrain.

In the crowded field of memoir, it’s the elevator pitch that sells copies, and this book certainly has one: a brother’s tragic suicide nestled within a narr...Read More

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Rainbow Rodeo

The Texas Gay Rodeo Association has been busting stereotypes for more than three decades.

Rainbow Rodeo The Texas Gay Rodeo Association has been busting stereotypes for more than three decades. – Photos by Brian Maschino @BrianMaschino June 11,...Read More

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‘The Last Cowboys’ is a Wild Ride All the Way Home

Pulitzer Prize winner John Branch takes a fascinating dive into what it's like to make a living by horseback, both on the range and at the rodeo.

Confession: I’ve never ridden a horse. I’ve never baled hay or branded a steer or helped a cow give birth. Perhaps you think this should disqualify me from ...Read More

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Chasing Tornadoes and Drama in ‘The Man Who Caught the Storm’

Dallas author Brantley Hargrove’s new biography of storm chaser Tim Samaras is a streamlined primer in tornado science — and a hell of a story.

At least he died doing what he loved. Brantley Hargrove doesn’t write a single sentence so crassly clichéd in The Man Who Caught the Storm. (He also doesn’...Read More

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