Hannah McBride

Hannah McBride, a bike commuter and Topo Chico guzzler, is an editorial fellow at the Observer. Previously, she wrote for the Boston Globe and screened calls for NPR's Car Talk.

By Hannah McBride:

 

In the Name of Our Ancestors

by | Mon, Jun 6, 2016 at 8:00 am CST
Austin City Council member Greg Casar introduces supporters of a “ban the box” ordinance for private employers at a press conference Tuesday, in advance of the council’s vote on Thursday.
Criminal Justice

Austin Poised to ‘Ban the Box’

The City Council is expected to approve a jobs ordinance that will push conversations about felony convictions later in the hiring process.

The City Council is expected to approve a jobs ordinance that will push conversations about felony convictions later in the hiring process. Read More

Advocacy groups and lawmakers say marijuana policy reform in Texas could be the fiscally responsible thing to do in light of an upcoming budget shortfall.
Criminal Justice

Will Texas Turn Green? Pot Panelists Say the State Is Ready

At SXSW, advocates say Texas lawmakers could add some financial cushioning to the budget by legalizing — and taxing — marijuana.

At SXSW, advocates say Texas lawmakers could add some financial cushioning to the budget by legalizing — and taxing — marijuana. Read More

The sun sets over Bastrop County, burned trees and barren land marring its horizon.
Environment

The Year in Disasters: Fracking, Fires and Floods

In 2015, we didn't have to fear acts of God — our disasters, fueled by climate change, were man-made.

Climatologists and other experts note that these cycles of heavy rain and intense drought are linked to climate change, which at this point is undoubtedly human-driven — no matter what billionaire coal miners say. Here’s a roundup of the damage our unique combination of human ingenuity and greed did to Texas, our Texas, this year. Read More

Test beds underneath Corpus Christi Bay
Culture

Postcard from the Incredible Electric Oyster Reef

Scientists hope to heal Corpus Christi's troubled waters.

Now, just offshore from the edge of the university’s campus, a Texas A&M project is underway to turn back the impact of time and development. A few feet under the water in Corpus Christi Bay is a grid made of thin steel bars, or rebar, and attached to it are solar panels, their poles planted underneath the waves. Read More

Articles
Top