Brad Tyer

Brad Tyer
Former Observer managing editor Brad Tyer currently lives in Missoula, Montana, where he edits the Missoula Independent.

By Brad Tyer:

 

At Home in the In-Between

by | Thu, Jun 29, 2017 at 10:42 am CST
White Shaman Mural, Pecos
Books

If These Walls Could Talk

The pictographs of the Pecos River have lasted millennia in a tempestuous desert, surviving mostly in silence. Now an archaeologist has cracked the code — and they can begin to speak again.

The pictographs of the lower Pecos have lasted millennia in a tempestuous desert, surviving mostly in silence. Now that a code has been cracked, and they can begin to speak again, archaeologist Carolyn Boyd worries there may not be enough time to hear everything they have to say. Read More

All The Houses by Karen Olsson
Books

Dramas of Family and State Unfold in ‘All the Houses’

Karen Olsson's novel is about coming to terms with the past in a family — and maybe in a country — that too often refuses to acknowledge any tense but the unreflective present.

Karen Olsson's novel is about coming to terms with the past in a family — and maybe in a country — that too often refuses to acknowledge any tense but the unreflective present. Read More

Book cover featuring a whale in the ocean
Books

The End is Nigh: What Now?

Cecile Pineda's 'Apology to a Whale' describes a disease, and seeks a cure, in language.

What is an appropriate response to the imminent end of the world? Well, first, a skeptic might reasonably beg the question, since the world as we know it (according to a variety of sources, some more risible than others) has been … Read More

Books

Book Review: Austin, Our Austin

"My Beautiful City Austin" is a humorous, self-depreciating collection of stories following a young architect as he navigates a city whose most pressing threat is its own popularity. Read More

Joe Ely, Butch Hancock and Jimmie Dale Gilmore
Books

New Biography Compiles the Legends of The Flatlanders

The triumvirate of Joe Ely, Jimmie Dale Gilmore and Butch Hancock is a singular musical entity. It’s also an acquired—if acclaimed—taste, and John T. Davis, one of the most well-seasoned of Texas-music scribes, doesn’t bother making too much of a case for the band’s undersung importance, neglected influence, or ill-acknowledged greatness. Read More

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