Economy

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Five Months Later, the State’s Unemployment System is Still Broken for Many Texans

The state’s unemployment insurance system was woefully unprepared when the COVID-fueled economic crisis hit in March. Months later, unemployed Texans are still struggling to get—and keep—their benefits.

In March, after losing her job with Rolfson Oil, Laura Orozco filed for unemployment. Her claim was denied. The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC), which administ...Read More

The cafeteria at Zavala Elementary school usually has children lined up according to their classrooms, but as of Thursday April 30, 2002, it is home to toys and activities for children attending the daycare to expend some energy in a controlled environment. Starting May 6, Zavala Elementary in Odessa Texas will begin operating its facilities as a daycare for children whose parents are medical professionals. (Ben Powell/Odessa American via AP) by

Texas Already Lacked Affordable Child Care. Then COVID-19 Hit.

The coronavirus has temporarily or permanently closed almost half of all child care providers in the state, leaving few options for low-income working families.

Jessica Nolen and her 5-year-old daughter had a morning routine. Fights with their alarm clocks first, some morning television, then quick berry smoothies, and ...Read More

** FILE ** A sign for The Dallas Morning News building is shown near the Belo Corp. headquarters building Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2007, in Dallas. Belo Corp. has announced Monday, Oct. 1, 2007, that it will spin off its newspaper division to create separate newspaper and television station companies. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File) by

Inside the Dallas Morning News Union Fight

North Texas journalists want to make labor history in the Lone Star State. The A. H. Belo Corporation would prefer they didn’t.

On the morning of July 20, journalists at the Dallas Morning News announced they were forming a union, a historic move in a state that hasn’t had a union news...Read More

An employee at Bufalina restaurant in Austin waits to deliver pick-up orders. by

How COVID-19 Threatens Texas’ Restaurant Industry

The COVID-19 pandemic threatens the future of the barbecue joints, taco trucks, bánh mì shops, and country cafes that make up Texas cuisine.

Open and Shut The COVID-19 pandemic threatens the future of the barbecue joints, taco trucks, bánh mì shops, and country cafes that make up Texas cuisine. By ...Read More

An illustration of COVID molecules and a field of oil rigs. by

From Boom to Bloodbath

The Permian Basin’s shale revolution is over and renewable energy is surging. What does that mean for Texas’ future?

From Boom to Bloodbath The Permian Basin’s shale revolution is over and renewable energy is surging. What does that mean for Texas’ future? By Justin Miller...Read More

A generic apartment complex building in Houston. by

Texas Landlords Are Filing Hundreds of Illegal Evictions

As courts reopen in Harris County, tenants may be removed from their homes as COVID-19 cases skyrocket, despite CARES Act protections that guarantee shelter.

In late April, the landlord at 2929 Dunvale Apartments—a garden-style apartment complex in Midwest Houston with one-bedroom apartments starting at $700 a mont...Read More

two signs: one says "we own it" and another says "asociacon de residentes north lamar" by

If You Can Buy It, By All Means Do That

Five years ago, facing significant rent increases and, in some cases, eviction, residents at the North Lamar Mobile Home Park organized. Now, they own the park.

If You Can Buy It, By All Means Do That Five years ago, facing significant rent increases and, in some cases, eviction, residents at the North Lamar Mobile Home...Read More

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