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Bartlett Appears Exclusively in the Texas Observer Conversation Piece Let them flatter who fear, it is not an American Art.JEFFERSON Follow the Leader We would draw our readers’ special attention to three of the rules proposed for Democratic Party state conventions at the Democrats of Texas meeting last weekend : honest factfinding procedures about contested county conventions, strict observance of the law requiring the installation of y the law requiring the installation of the nominees of the senatorial district caucuses on the state Democratic executive committee, and an end to the stacking of convention committees by the faction in control of the convention stage. Such is the substance of the reforms the DOT organization seeks. These are not radical, or even liberal things : they are simply prerequisites for a democratic Democratic Party. Haggling and in-fighting aside, what should the state convention of the Democratic Party really be like? It should be orderly \(without armed possemen present to intimidate the for decisionsin committees, on the stage, on the convention floor should spring directly from the real majority, freely acting. But accommodation among factions is not unthinkable ; indeed, were the procedures fair, it would be unthinkable that some accomodations would not occur. But as long as the procedures are so rank, the convention can be .stolen by the gavel, a harmonious convention is simply out of the question. Visualize the 1958 convention. The substantive differences of opinion will concern the party platform, the party nominees, and the state party’s relationships with the national party. These things ought to be resolved by the whole convention acting under democratic rules. But as it appears now, it will be a dogfight again. In the first place, while Governor Daniel bleeds loudly for harmony, he keeps at the top of the state party staff the personified foe of 5he SharL In passing we would commend the Texas Legislative Council for finally agreeing to study the small loan problem. This means that the 1959 legislature will have no excuse of any kind for failing to tow in the sharks and hang them by their fins to dry and die. Ah,Jla eA r t. Rep Jerry Sadler says Gov. Daniel “had nothing but the highest for Gov. Faubus’s armed rebellion against the federal government. Say it ain’t so, Priceor is it? SEPTEMBER 20, 1957 Published by Texas Observer Co.. Ltd. Ronnie Dugger Editor and Geneva Manager Lyman Jones, Associate Editor Sarah Payne, Office Manager Dean Johnston, Circulation Advertising Published cnce a week from Austin, Texas. Delivered postage prepaid $4 per annum. Advertising rates available on request. Extra copies 10c each. Quantity orders available. Entered as second-class matter April 26, 1937, at the Post Office at Austin, Texas, under the act of March 3, 1879. most of the Democrats in Texas, one Jake Picklethe man who hacked down Ralph Yarborough in 1954, the man who decapitated duly elected state committee members at Fort Worth. If Daniel wants to live down Fort Worth \(as well and his aides sometimes intimate, the least he can do is ditch the chief hatchetmart of the Port Arthur and Fort Worth carnages. How can he in good faith plead for harmony when his right-hand man is monthly using the state party newsletter to blacken and insult every laboring man and woman and every liberal Democrat in Texas ? Second, Daniel and the executive committee.could put up or shut up on fair -Democratic Party procedures. They have not said a word to this fair day. We would not ask them to humiliate themselves by apologizing for Fort Worth \(a subonly ask that they seek to agree in advance on conditions for a fair state convention next year. Third, they could endorF,! the party registration bill that is so manifestly and incontrovertibly in the interests of the Democrats of the state. Daniel has yet to say a word about it publicly. Party registration is an issue around which a harmonious state convention could really unite. We speak for no one but the person shoving this pen along ,this lined yellow pad, but we would prefer harmony, tooharmony and fairness ; harmony and majority rule ; harmony and party integrity. DOT has now made a real and genuine effort to bargain on these matters with Daniel and the state committee. Will they respond? Or will they go on, in the branded Pickle style, of talking peace while making mayhem? ..Wulfinan The House investigating committee, or rather a few Members thereof, made perfect asses of themselves with B enJack Cage. They were told by a state prosecutor that a taped interview with an ICT official might help prospective defendants, but they had no BenJack, so, under the whip from Chairman Reagan Huffman, they played it to keep the show going..It was a grab for press, pure and very simple ; but when the tape turned out to be a flop for headlines, they just cut it off and accepted a transcript of the rest of it in evidence \(which they Finally, chairman Huffman let drop a few entirely gratuitous, carefullyphrased insults to Cage, whom he knew would not talk back. A sorry day, in sooth. 10 We will serve no group or party but will hew hard to the truth as we find it and the right as we see it. We are dedicated to the whole truth, to human values above all interests, to the rights of man as the foundation of democracy; we will take orders from none but our own conscience, and never will we overlook or misrepresent the truth to serve the interests of the powerful or cater to the ignoble in the human spirit. Editorial and business office: 504 West 24th St., Austin, Texas. Phone GReenwood 7-0746. Houston Office: 2501 Crawford. Mrs. R D. Randolph, Dean Johnston. AUSTIN How is a person to respond to politicians? In the political journals no confusion yields a worse mish-mash of judgments. A good man has compromised. A bad man has done the right thing. A purist has fallen. A whore is redeemed. You can find as many things said by as many people about the same man and the same deed he has done. Sometimes ideas themselves become cliches, and one cliche idea is, categories are to be avoided. A category is a pigeon-hole .and a pigeon hole is strictly for pigeons. It goes something like that. But it has been fun in conversation to play with the idea of categories for politicians. Grade them up or down, as you will, but the politicians of my experience do tend to fall into five kinds, each kind distinct from each other. Category One. The individualist, or the philosophical anarchist, who is in politics by accident, probably doesn’t belong there, and probably won’t last. He does what he thinks right and if the people like it, fine, if not, they can . vote against him. Immune to democracy, a misfit in public life because his character is private, he comes and goes, stirring zealots of his kind and puzzling the people at large. Such a one is Maury Maverick, Jr. Senator Paul Douglas of Illinois is another. We would so class the late Bob Taft but for one lapse. In the current Texas legislature it is perhaps Bob Wheeler of Tilden, or Bob Mullen of Alice. As I understand these men, they do what they do, vote as they vote, because of private belief only. Category Two. The idealist of one stripe or another; who comes to terms on an issue or two that he may persist in public life as an influence for the body of his ideals. He will risk his people’s wrath but not their outright fury. He is also honest, but he may cast a vote that is, considered by itself, dishonest: he can be dishonest honorably. He is not so individualistic, not so egoistic, that the suffering of a principle yielded is worse for him than the loss of public influence. \(But after category one you do not illusCategory Three. The litmus-paper legislator. On each issue he tries to find out what his people think and then he votes that way. The only really representative representative, he indulges no personal convictions ; he is a transparent vessel through whom pass the dark waters of public opinion. Were this a pure democracy, he would be the only kind Of politician we would tolerate, but it is not, and he hardly registers at all. The rarest of the species. Category Four. The dishonest vestigial-idealist. He was raised this way or that, that is, he has had ideals ; he understands what he’has been. But he often, he has come to use them when they are handy in argument and turn their symbol-forms against them when they are not. The pivot on which his decisions really turn is self-interest : what will this mean for me? He is not a cynic ; often he is sentimental, and defeats or victories are tragic, glorious, personally. A discerning man can sense his depravity after one argument with him. Category Five.. The buccaneer in politics, the filibustering cynic riding the mighty main for laughs. He has principles, probably, somewhere, but they don’t matter. He has studied the jewelled routes and he is scourging them. ‘What he wants varies, but he generally gets it if he’s talented, since he can direct all his talents, with no slippage, toward his object. He is not diverted by ideals, his or anybody else’s ; he does not care what the people think, he is never so ,fatuous that he lets his sentiment get in the way of the game. As is the way with radicals, the anarchists and the privateers have more in common than the others. The others carry on the day to day work of the democracy, enter malleable coalitions to arrive at decisions, even move, as they grow older or younger, from one category to another. But the lonely ones, the outsiders at either end, are known in later years as the prophets and pariahs of their time. er . RONNIE DUGGER Zip &leas Omni= Ji artnony ,